January 2014 Farm Report Vol. 1, No. 3

Here we are – the moon almost ready to move into the 4th quarter and me about a week behind the last full moon of 22:56 hours CT, 15 January 2014.  My grandfather, my major hero in life, had a knack for being able to not take himself too overtly seriously saying when he had been up and moving, particularly busy – “I’ve been a busy woman!”  So, borrowing from my good ole grandfather long passed, I’ve been a busy woman! — please see a few pictures included in this report.

Winter Green From Wildflowers

Winter Green From Wildflowers

Picture #1, taken in the dead of winter (10 Jan – 10 Feb, 2014), shows the outstanding beautiful green of those well-rooted tough wildflowers that will have their glory in the spring.  For my way of thinking, what a thought!, replacing all the Bermuda grasses, Saint Augustine grasses, etc., poison-sucking non-natives with yards that at times bloom flowers or at least have a continual stand of green; the non-needies without want of fertilizers, water or other artificial means.  At this point, I gotta give a plug to probably, in my opinion, the best supplier of wildflowers in the great state of Texas:  Native American Seed at www.seedsource.com.

Pictures #2 & #3 are part of the “busy woman” reality during the past month I’ve been preparing the many new bare-rooted pecan trees I’ve put in at what I believe is the most appropriate time (preferably just after the full moon during the third quarter and ideally the moon being in a water sign, preferably Pisces).  This January it happened to be one of the other water signs – Cancer.

Bare-Root Pecan Tree

Bare-Root Pecan Tree

Picture #2:  Please note just a little may I be of help with an FYI.  Notice the freshly planted bare-root tree has a white piece of plastic tie right at ground level (don’t be confused with the blue plastic at the tree’s graft)?  This plastic tightly tied marks the exact place the bare-rooted tree had been for many, many months of its life.  It needs to go back into the ground at that exact depth level for best results for its many next years of growth.

 

 

Tractor Post Hole Digger

Tractor Post Hole Digger

Picture #3:  The tractor’s post hole digger picture shows the saving grace for this old man, Ernie.  Dig an ugly hole – three hits in a triangulated pattern into the hard ground gets a large part of planting that tree’s job done!  Voila!  An ugly hole rough and ready!

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